Welcome Green Monsters! We're your online guide to making conscious choices that help people, animals and the planet.
slideshow

10 Tips on Eating Plant-Strong for Athletic Performance

Certain nutritional strategies go a long way in terms of recovery, adaptation and improvement, yet many athletes are at a loss on where to start. While formulating a performance boosting diet can be daunting task for vegetarians, I assure you that with a few minor alterations, you’ll be ready to pursue success. Here are 10 tips to set you on your way!

1. Carbs

Recipe: Baked Stuffed Sweet Potato and Sriracha Cashew Cheese Sauce

Low carb diets (3-15% calorie intake) consistently are shown to reduce both high-intensity and endurance performance. They are crucial for enhancing glycogen stores and as a result, boost recovery between workouts. Luckily most of the tastiest foods are filled with carbs; bananas and sweet potatoes are my go to foods while I’m training. Try these great recipes: Chickpea, Sweet Potato, Kale, Green Olive, Dried Fruit and Cashew TagineSweet Potato Tofu Pizza Sweet Potato, Red Cabbage and Kelp Noodle Bowl with Rich Miso Dressing and this Sweet Potato Pie Smoothie.

This content provided above is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


Disclosure: One Green Planet accepts advertising, sponsorship, affiliate links and other forms of compensation, which may or may not influence the advertising content, topics or articles written on this site. Click here for more information.

11 comments on “10 Tips on Eating Plant-Strong for Athletic Performance”

Sign on with:
Click to add comment
Samantha Valera
11 Months Ago

Jerry-Jessica L Dean


Reply
Fabél Fabuleus
11 Months Ago

High protein is a myth, read 80/10/10. 10% fat and 10% protein is key to get and stay healthy, and yes get in shape and stay fit!


Reply
Vegan Matters
11 Months Ago

Vegetable proteins are NOT incomplete. This has been disproven over and over. All plants contain all essential amino acids which therefore become protein chains in our bodies.


Reply
Jana Leland
11 Months Ago

as usual--all things in moderation!


Reply
Thavy Lor
11 Months Ago

On a side note, I boil the hard part (the middle) of kale leaves and it taste delicious. I say it's taste similar to artichoke, but better. I cut it up about 2 to 3 inches each to put into a pot. P.S. I don't eat it with butter. I love it plain just like that.


Reply
Alexander Peppe
11 Months Ago

I know NPR just did a story on it, but the thyroid business really only applies when you're consuming a nightmarish amount of raw kale (several pounds daily, and it has to be raw). You'd be hurling it before it altered thyroid function.


Reply
Matt Sedivy
11 Months Ago

Great info!


Reply
Anita Weber
11 Months Ago

Just not too much - it will interfere with your thyroid!


Reply
Gabriel Garcia
11 Months Ago

Way to go!


Reply
Ni Cole
11 Months Ago

This is great


Reply


Subscribe to our Newsletter




Follow us on


Do Not Show This Again

×

Submit to OneGreenPlanet


Terms & Conditions ×