These peanut butter cookie dough bites are to die for. The simple cookie dough is augmented with mini chocolate chips and finished off with a creamy peanut butter center. You won't be able to stop eating these delightful little bites.

Raw Peanut Butter Stuffed Cookie Dough Bites [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

$2.99
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Ingredients

  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon peanut butter divided
  • 1/3 cup peanut butter powder
  • 3-4 tablespoon agave nectar, to taste
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • A pinch of salt
  • 2 1/2 tablespoon vegan chocolate chips 

Preparation

  1. Place the drained and rinsed chickpeas, 2 tablespoons of the peanut butter (saving the rest for later), the peanut butter powder, agave, vanilla, cinnamon and a pinch of salt into a small food processor.
  2. Blend the ingredients until the mixture is thick, creamy and smooth. This could take a good 5-7 minutes, and you'll need to scrape down the sides to get all the chickpea.
  3. Transfer the dough into a bowl and stir in the chocolate chips.
  4. Make a heaping 1/2 tablespoon-sized ball of the dough and break it into two small balls.
  5.  Flatten the two pieces and place 1/4 teaspoon of peanut butter onto the center of one of the rounds. Place the other round on top, seal the sides, and roll it into a ball.
  6. Repeat with remaining dough


Comments

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  1. This recipe is not "raw", because the recipe calls for agave syrup. Agave syrup is not a "raw" food!

    Here is why…

    For a food to be considered "raw", some experts state it can not be heated up past 104°F – 120°F. Agave Syrup is boiled between 140°F – 160+°F when it is being processed!

    The fibrous blue agave pina is taken to the mill where it is pressed and its inulin-rich juice is collected and cleaned.

    Inulin, a dietary fiber made up of complex carbohydrates, is not sweet by nature. Cooking (or hydrolyzing) the inulin transforms it into sweet nectar. When making the Light Blue Agave nectar, the juice is heated to 161°F* (72°C). However, when making the Raw Blue Agave nectar, the process is lower and much slower: the juice is warmed to a tepid 118°F (37°C), and the low heat is maintained for nearly twice as long. In this simple process, the inulin becomes fructose, a slowly metabolizing simple sugar found in many fruits and vegetables. Filtering determines the blue agave nectars flavor and color. The Light Blue Agave is simply more filtered than its Raw-Amber counterpart.

    * It\’s purely coincidental that Light Blue Agave is hydrolyzed at 161°F, the same temperature that milk is pasteurized. The intent in exposing the agave\’s liquid inulin to that temperature is to convert it to fructose, not to pasteurize it.

    💥 Agave Nectar: A Sweetener That is Even Worse Than Sugar
    https://authoritynutrition.com/agave-nectar-is-even-worse-than-sugar/

    💥 Raw Agave Syrup Nectar:
    Not as healthy as you may think. Nutrition Facts Low Glycemic Warning
    https://www.living-foods.com/articles/agave.html