These pancakes are an interesting fusion of two different worlds; horchata and mochi! Combined, you get these deliciously sweet, chewy pancakes. More mo-chata, please! “Real Food Really Fast: Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Ready in 10 Minutes Or Less” by Hannah Kaminsky is full of amazing and easy recipes. Check it out from Skyhorse Publishing!

Horchata-Flavored Mochi Pancakes [Vegan]

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Calories

368

Serves

2

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup glutinous white rice flour (Mochiko)
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup plain non-dairy milk
  • 1 tablespoon light agave nectar
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
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Preparation

  1. Whisk both flours, cinnamon, baking powder and soda, and salt together into a bowl, making sure that all the dry goods are equally distributed throughout. Separately, mix together the nondairy milk, agave, oil, and vinegar. Pour the liquid ingredients into the bowl of dry, whisking vigorously until the batter is smooth. A few small lumps are fine to leave in the mix, so there's no need to go too crazy.
  2. Meanwhile, lightly grease a large non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat on the stove. When hot, ladle out a scant 1/4 cup or so of the batter for each pancake, forming rounds approximately 3–4 inches in diameter. Give the pancakes enough space that you can easy maneuver a spatula underneath and flip them. Cook for 3–4 minutes on each side, flipping once the underside is golden brown and bubbles have burst on top. If you can't cook all the pancakes at once, repeat as necessary.
  3. Top with sliced almonds, a sprinkle of additional cinnamon, confectioner's sugar, or a drizzle of good old maple syrup.
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Nutritional Information

Per Serving: Calories: 368 | Carbs: 76g | Fat: 4g | Protein: 9g | Sodium: 51mg | Sugar: 9g Note: The information shown is based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.


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