When we think about animals used for pharmaceutical testing, rats or other small rodents usually come to mind, not animals–like dogs–that we think of as pets. Right? It may come as a surprise, but across the United States, hundreds of thousands of beagles are used for laboratory experiments. If you are wondering why you’ve never heard about that before, it’s because universities and medical facilities that use beagles for testing work very hard to keep this fact from reaching the public.

While beagles in the testing industry go largely unnoticed by mainstream media, that doesn’t mean that no one is working to end this cruel treatment of beagles–and all other lab animals for that matter. Beagle Freedom Project, is one such organization working to spread the word about lab animals and moreover, they play an incredible role in rescuing animals from lab facilities once testing is completed.

Advertisement

The sad truth is most animal used for lab tests are killed after their trials are complete. Beagle Freedom Project is working to end this practice, they helped pass legislation in Minnesota to legally require that animals used for testing get a chance at adoption and a happy life, and also work closely with labs to rescue animals after testing ends.

Most recently, BFP saved seven beagles from a lab facility in the South of Texas! After arranging foster families and organizing the rescue, the seven little dogs are finally free. Like other beagles saved by BFP, the dogs relished in the moment stepping on the grass for the first time.

Zoom Pet Photography
 

The dogs will no longer be identified by their testing numbers, but by their respective names: Candy, Luca, Frida, Dolly, Nina, Bobby, and Grumpy.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Zoom Pet Photography
 

On the Beagle Freedom website, rescuer Kevin Chase, describes the condition of the dogs, “All of the dogs seemed very malnourished with little muscle tone. Their teeth are in bad shape and their skin and coats are dirty and rough looking.”

Zoom Pet Photography
 

But despite this, “Their spirits were not broken though,” in true dog fashion, Chase explains, “They were excited to explore and pack together on this new adventure. This group of beagles had a stronger than normal fascination with the grass and were eager to sniff, feel, roll around in and even eat it.”

Advertisement

Zoom Pet Photography
 

These seven beagles now finally have the chance to live the life they deserve and to explore all the grass they desire! Foster families have already been arranged for all seven dogs and they are on their way to a happy new home filled with love and care.

Advertisement

Zoom Pet Photography
 

To learn more about the work of Beagle Freedom Project, click here.

Lead image source: Zoom Pet Photography 

Advertisement