Welcome Green Monsters! We're your online guide to making conscious choices that help people, animals and the planet.
Download food monster: the biggest, baddest, yummiest vegan food app!
single

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR Newsletter

Food Monster - Features

Never Waste Produce Again! Your Guide to the Shelf Life of Produce

LIKE OGP ON FACEBOOK :

Produce is very finicky and can expire far before you want to eat it, and when it does, you feel terrible for wasting food and contributing to landfill accumulation. For times like those, we have made this list of common produce items and how long they stay fresh and delicious in hopes that you’ll never have to throw produce away again.

Apples

Whole apples generally last two to four weeks unrefrigerated and one to two months refrigerated. If apples are placed in an area 30 – 40° F with high humidity (which is rare in most households), then they will last for about six months. Estimations of shelf life and quality are made by assessing the firmness and soluble dry matter content — the total dry matter content can be affected by growing conditions and cultivation techniques and a higher content means a higher flavor concentration.

Apricots

Raw apricots can be stored for one to three weeks until ripe in the pantry or unrefrigerated. Once ripe, apricots can be stored for four to five days in the refrigerator.

Bananas

Bananas last for two to five days on the counter, unrefrigerated until ripe, but they can be refrigerated (not recommended) for five to seven days or until ripe. If bananas are refrigerated, their skin will turn black, but that does not mean the fruit is rotten. Peel and place bananas in a plastic bag or container to extend the shelf life of them to two or three months.

Blueberries

Blueberries should ideally be placed in a shallow container, covered, and refrigerated. If refrigerated, blueberries last for one to two weeks. Do not bulk wash blueberries — this speeds up decomposition — only wash a small amount of blueberries prior to being consumed.

Broccoli

Similar to Brussels sprouts, unwashed, refrigerated broccoli lasts for three to five days. Only wash and cut broccoli before eating it.

Brussels Sprouts

Unwashed, whole Brussels sprouts last three to five days in the fridge. Prior to consumption, thoroughly wash each head, peeling off the outer leaves.

Carrots

Fresh, raw, peeled carrots and baby carrots need to be wrapped in plastic or aluminum foil and refrigerated. They last two to three weeks in this condition.

Dinosaur Kale (or regular kale)

Refrigerated and unwashed kale lasts for five to seven days. Wash only a specific portion at a time to avoid premature spoiling.

Eggplant

If refrigerated, eggplant lasts five to seven days.

Figs

Fresh figs only last for one to two days in the refrigerator.

Grapes

Grapes need to be refrigerated in a perforated bag or slotted container. They will stay fresh if refrigerated in this manner for five to seven days. Grapes should not be washed in bulk and only the amount that is going to be eaten should be washed to prevent spoiling.

Heirloom Tomatoes

Fresh, whole tomatoes can be placed in the pantry or on the kitchen counter (the latter is preferable) for one to five days or until ripe. Alternatively, they can be put in the refrigerator for two to three days if they are ripe. The best way to get the most flavor out of tomatoes is to allow them to ripen at room temperature and then refrigerate them if need be.

Iceberg/Romaine Lettuce

Iceberg and romaine lettuce are both good for about a week if refrigerated and unwashed. Wash them when ready to use.

Jicama

Fresh, raw jicama should be stored in the refrigerator — it lasts for a week to two weeks, depending on its ripeness.

Kiwis

Kiwis can be stored on the counter for two to three day until they ripen, and after they ripen, they can be refrigerated whole for five to seven days.

Lemons

At room temperature in the pantry or on the kitchen counter, lemons can be stored for about a week. In the refrigerator, the yellow citrus can stay fresh anywhere from two to three weeks.

Melons (Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Honeydew)

Cantaloupe and honeydew should be stored at room temperature until it ripens (two to four days) and then refrigerated for seven to 10 days. Watermelon stays fresh for seven to 10 days unrefrigerated and for two weeks if refrigerated. Honeydew should be ripened at room temperature for two to four days and then placed in the refrigerator and eaten within five to seven days.

Nectarines and Peaches

Whole nectarines and peaches should be stored on the counter or in the pantry in a relatively cool space until ripe which usually takes two to three days (one to three days for peaches). After they have ripened, they should be stored in the refrigerator and eaten within three to five days.

Oranges

Let oranges ripen for up to a week at room temperature. Then, refrigerate them and eat within two to three weeks.

Potatoes

Potatoes normally last one to two weeks stored at room temperature and in a bag that allows for circulation. To further extend the shelf life of potatoes, store in a cool (45-55° F) dark area; under those storage conditions, potatoes will last about two to three months. It is best to not store potatoes near onions because together they set off a chemical reaction that quickly spoils both of them.

We, here at One Green Planet, hope that this list will be useful to you. Happy cooking and eating!

Image source: Creative Commons



Want to read more posts like this? Sign up for our newsletter below!​

Browse through some recent posts below:

15 Decadent Vegan Cakes That Need to be Made Into Cake Pops

pistachio cake

15 Healthier, Vegan Versions of All Your Junk Food Favorites

Skip the Junk Food and Make Healthier Versions of Your Favorites

15 Fruity, Refreshing Summer Desserts That Remind Us of Cocktails

raw strawberry lime tart

Save Time in the Kitchen With Your Pressure Cooker — Try These 15 Recipes!

sloppy lentils

Disclosure: One Green Planet accepts advertising, sponsorship, affiliate links and other forms of compensation, which may or may not influence the advertising content, topics or articles written on this site. Click here for more information.

15 comments on “Never Waste Produce Again! Your Guide to the Shelf Life of Produce”

Click to add comment
Doris M Boykin
2 Years Ago

Most useful!


Reply
Ron Kinch
2 Years Ago

Your site has THE most annoying pop-ups. A full 30 seconds before I can close the ad, much longer when the internet is slow. Then it comes back up a few mins later.


Reply
Helene Reilly
2 Years Ago

Thanks very informative, I have a new energy efficient fridge and I find my fruit and veg last a little bit longer.


Reply
Bryan Ramos
2 Years Ago

Andrew Volkers


Reply
Mary T. Jefferies
2 Years Ago

Lovin this


Reply
Eva Ria
2 Years Ago

Afroditi Iliadou


Reply
Kevin Scanlan
2 Years Ago

Yvonne Tudela Scanlan


Reply
Elizabeth Meyer
2 Years Ago

There are quite a few fruits/veggies missing in this guide. Where can I find one that is more expansive?


Reply
Shameem Moideen
2 Years Ago


Reply
Simone Fortune
2 Years Ago

Xakk Hughes


Reply


Subscribe to our Newsletter




Follow us on


Do Not Show This Again

×

Submit to OneGreenPlanet


Terms & Conditions ×