It can be incredibly dangerous for a baby elephant when they wander off from the herd. For starters, baby elephants are completely dependent on their mothers for food for the first two to three years of their lives. Second, the herd provides safety from large predators until the elephant can gain some size.

Which is exactly why the situation was considered an emergency for the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy when they discovered an extremely young calf was wandering alone, completely separated from its herd. To make matters worse, there was a pride of 10 lions not far away, just waiting for their opportunity. Springing to action, the caring rangers for Lewa’s anti-poaching team began making the trip back to the calf’s herd which were over half a mile away.

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With the elephant population of northern Kenya topping 6,500 animals, these rangers and those who work toward the conservation and protection of wildlife there have their work cut out for them! (You can contribute to their efforts HERE and HERE if you’re interested in helping more them do all they can on the ground level for elephants like this one.)

On behalf of this little sweetheart’s mother, thank you Lewa Wildlife Conservancy anti-poaching team!

After discovering the calf, the team knew they had to get such a young baby back to the herd or the odds of survival would be slim. 

Lost Baby Elephant Is Reunited With Mom Thanks to Kind RangersLost Baby Elephant Is Reunited With Mom Thanks to Kind Rangers

The anti-poaching team was quick to take action, gently steering the baby in the direction that the herd had gone.

Lost Baby Elephant Is Reunited With Mom Thanks to Kind Rangers

They had to work to keep the baby calm along the way so it wouldn’t panic and attempt to flee.

Lost Baby Elephant Is Reunited With Mom Thanks to Kind Rangers

Once they reached the herd, the rangers stopped a safe distance away. The calf’s mother ran over to collect her baby, making for quite the happy ending!

Lost Baby Elephant Is Reunited With Mom Thanks to Kind Rangers

All image source: Lewa Wildlife Conservancy/Facebook

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