You can’t help but be inspired by the tireless work these orangutan caregivers, aka “babysitters,” give to the orphaned orangutan babies they look after. The important work of these babysitters consists of acting as surrogates and teaching the young babies skills they will need to eventually return to the forest. Most of the baby orangutans were separated from their mothers, most often by force at very young ages.

Sadly, the orangutan population is being greatly endangered by the palm oil industry, and as their native homes are leveled for palm plantations, they easily fall victim to ill-intentioned people. Orangutans who wander onto plantations are viewed as pests and either shot on site or captured and sold into the illegal pet industry – or worse. These little ones were lucky to make it out alive and find themselves in the care of this organization.

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The work of the BOS Foundation and its workers requires long hours and a lot of responsibility including feeding them, providing them with comfort, nursing them when they are sick, and building their confidence. When it comes to survival skills the orangutans learn how to climb trees, build nests, identify natural foods and forage, and identify predators.

Between the two rehabilitation centers, Samboji Lestari and Nyaru Menteng, they care for more than 600 orangutans. Without the dedication and love given by the babysitters of the BOS Foundation, the babies would not survive in the wild. We certainly commend them for their work and hope these little ones will be able to return to the forest, in peace, one day.

To learn more about the loving and dedicated work of the BOS Foundation and its babysitters click here.

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