This is part of our #5under5 recipe series, a collection of original plant-based recipes made by yours truly that cost less than $5 per serving and can be made with only five ingredients. No way, right?! This recipe is an accidental homage to one of our favorite restaurants; Blossom du Jour. They have a killer beet burger on their menu (if you're in NYC, you must try it!). It's smoky, spicy, a little sweet, and incredibly juicy and tender – a truly incredible sandwich experience. When we set out to make our own beet burger, we decided to add some smoked paprika to the mix to see what would happen, and lo and behold, we discovered that it tasted just like our favorite burger from Blossom! We were so smitten with the result that we couldn't help but share it with you. And you can make five whole patties for under $5.00. What a steal! Have an idea for a #5under5 recipe? Send it to [email protected] and you might just see it on the site next week! If you make this dish, make sure to post it on social media with #5under5 and @onegreenplanet so we can see your amazing creation! Total Cost Per Serving (5 burger patties): $2.98

#5under5: Smoky Paprika Beet Burgers With Spicy Tahini Sauce [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

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Ingredients

The main ingredients in this recipe are beets, eggplant, chickpeas, quinoa, and flax seed meal. Pantry/optional items include smoked paprika and lemon.

 

Burgers:

  • 1 cup raw beets (about 1 or 2 large), peeled and shredded or finely chopped – $1.13
  • 3/4 cup eggplant, cubed and lightly steamed until fork-tender (not peeled) – $0.75
  • 1/2 cup quinoa, cooked – $0.62
  • 1/2 15-ounce can chickpeas – $0.40
  • 1 "flax egg" (1 tablespoon flax seed meal whisked with 3 tablespoons warm water) – $0.08
  • 1/2 tablespoon smoked paprika (optional, or your favorite spices)
  • A squeeze of lemon juice (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Spicy Paprika Tahini Sauce (optional):

  • 3 tablespoons tahini
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • Dash of hot sauce
  • Squeeze of lemon juice
  • Salt to taste

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Preparation

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F.
  2. Transfer the shredded beets to a large mixing bowl and set aside.
  3. In a blender or food processor, pulse the cooked eggplant and chickpeas together until a thick, chunky paste is formed. Don’t get this puree completely smooth – you want to keep a fair amount of eggplant pieces and chickpeas intact.
  4. Scrape out the eggplant and chickpea puree and add it to the mixing bowl with the beets. Add the cooked quinoa, flax egg, and paprika. Mix and adjust seasoning. Add a squeeze of lemon if you want or have it.
  5. Using a half-cup measure to portion out the burger dough, make five patties. Definitely wear gloves for this part, unless you want hot pink hands!
  6. Grease a baking sheet with olive oil and place the patties. Bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the patties are crisp-looking on the outside and cooked through on the inside. You may need to flip them over once or twice during baking to ensure they are evenly browned.
  7. Once the burgers are cooked, pile them on buns with your favorite burger fixings and an extra drizzle of tahini sauce!

Notes

You could also enjoy these burger patties without the buns, such as on a bed of lettuce or accompanying your favorite grains and veggies. The cost of the serving size above is based on the NYC Metro Area product pricing below: Beets (1 pound): $1.69 Eggplant (1 large): $1.79 Chickpeas (15-ounce can): $0.79 Flax seed meal: $2.79 Quinoa: $2.50

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Nutritional Information

Total Calories: 507 | Total Carbs: 68 g | Total Fat: 4 g | Total Protein: 21 g | Total Sodium: 915 g | Total Sugar: 28 g (Per Serving: makes 5 patties) Calories: 101 | Carbs: 14 g | Fat: 1 g | Protein: 4 g | Sodium: 266 mg | Sugar: 6 g We calculated the sodium content taking into consideration that draining and rinsing canned beans reduces sodium content by 41 percent. Note: The information shown is based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.