The amazing actions of dedicated individuals acting for the environment are one of the things that keep us going – especially when we are surrounded by things like negative news and statistics about plastic pollution, animal deaths, and the bleakness of the future if we don’t make a change. It is even uplifting when the people behind these great undertakings are young and just at the beginning of their efforts to make a change – nothing is as heartening as the idea that the future generations may prove much wiser and shape the world into something far better than it is now. And with 300 million tons of plastic produced each year and 8.8 million tons dumped into the oceans, we certainly do need it to change for the better.

At 22 years old, Jason Knight, a BA Industrial Design and Technology student from Brunel University in London, created his own way of dealing with plastic waste in his local community. He designed a compact press that forms plastic bags into… skateboards! Interestingly, these boards are traditionally made from plywood and are one of the biggest causes of Canadian maple deforestation. Add that to the fact that serious skateboarders can go through dozens of decks every year, and the idea of a skateboard created with zero waste and no harm to the environment becomes even more fantastic.

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Knight believes that recycling could easily become more attractive and simply fun, if the end result is something actually worth the work for young people, Phys.org reports. Skateboards surely fill those criteria – the personal reward is a great incentive, especially for teenagers, to start collecting plastic bags. Another great thing about the post-plastic skateboards is their aesthetic value – their design is very appealing and, what is more, the colors on the finished product can be fully chosen by the creator.

The student now hopes that independent skate shops could ultimately create their own recycling centers so that people would be able to use the press with their collected plastic.

If you’re inspired by this story and want to start reducing the amount of plastic you use every day – check out One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic campaign!

Image source: Jason Knight/Phys.org

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