While the circus can appear like a wonderful opportunity for people to get up close and personal with wild animals, many do not understand the cruelty inherent in these performances. The incredible feats and tricks that the animals in the circus perform appear to be effortless, joyful actions, however, they are largely motivated by pain and fear. Sadly, there is nothing fun about a circus for the animals.

Luckily, it seems that as the public comes to realize the cruelty involved in these shows, they are demanding chance. A great example of this is Ringling Brother’s recent decision to phase out the use of elephants in their shows. Times are changing, and more and more people are taking a stand and refusing to fund animal suffering for the purpose of entertainment.

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Another clear sign of this amazing progress is the news that the San Francisco Board of Supervisors has voted unanimously to ban wild or exotic animal performances within the city. This scope of this ban will include using animals for public display, television shows, commercials and even movies. The proposed ban will be finalized later this week at the City Council meeting.

According to Reuters, “The measure bars any public showing, carnival, fair, parade, petting zoo, ride, race, film shoot or other undertaking in which wild or exotic animals ‘are required to perform tricks, fight or participate as accompaniments for the entertainment, amusement or benefit of an audience.'”

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San Francisco is just one of eight other California municipalities that have enacted similar bans on wild animal entertainment, illustrating that this positive trend is here to stay!

We could not be more pleased to see this sort of progress and hope that this means other municipalities across the U.S. will follow suit!

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Image source: Flickr

Great news for animals! The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has voted unanimously to ban wild or exotic animal performances within the city. This scope of this ban will include using animals for public display, television shows, commercials and even movies.