While snowy owls do spend time in a number of U.S. states during the winter, the country has seen quite an influx of this beautiful species this year.

As Wayne Pacelle, President and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) reports, the birds have been showing up areas like the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia and as far south as Arkansas, North Carolina and Florida.

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In fact, experts are saying that this year marks the largest snowy owl migration the country has seen in decades.

Unfortunately, a presence increase can result in more collisions with humans via cars and planes.

Just this past December, a “shoot-to-kill order” was issued by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey when a snowy owl flew into a plane’s engine at the JFK Airport.

At least two snowy owls were reported to be killed after the order was issued, however a public outcry soon followed and forced authorities to adopt a humane trapping and relocation method to keep both plane passengers and snowy owls safe.

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Still, crashes do occur and it’s typically the birds that bear the bulk of the injuries.

Recently, a snowy owl in Cape Cod, Mass. was found lying in a street by animal control officers.

Deborah Robbins Millman
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He was quickly taken to Cape Wildlife Center, operated by the Fund of Animals and the HSUS, where he was examined to see the extent of his injuries. Thankfully, nothing was broken and he only suffered a wing fracture.

Deborah Robbins Millman

During his stay at Cape Wildlife Center, staff members worked with this beautiful bird to get him strong and ready for release back into the wild.

Deborah Robbins Millman

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Once his blood levels were stable and center staff deemed him fit enough, he was freed right off the coast of Cape Cod!

Kelly Coffin

Watch this stunning owl fly back to freedom in the video below! What a joy to see!

 

Lead image source: Deborah Robbins Millman

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