National Geographic is a pioneer in the forefront of photographic imagery, and they have long introduced people to the unknown and unseen corners of the globe with the use of stunning images and video footage. And now, National Geographic is raising the bar even higher with the introduction of a new aquarium in Times Square. But this is no ordinary aquarium; this aquarium is created with the use of technology and features no live animals.

The experience is called Encounter: Ocean Odyssey, and it takes visitors on a mesmerizing tour into the depths of the Pacific Ocean. You can walk through coral reefs, witness giant squid and massive schools of fish envelop around you, interact with marine mammals, and see sharks up close and personal.

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The footage is unbelievably lifelike and was made by the animators responsible for the visual effects of Game of Thrones, and the soundtrack was created by a Grammy-award winning composer.

Additionally, there are features about conservation and plastic pollution that inspire people to protect our oceans. And the icing on the cake: 27 percent of each ticket sale goes directly towards ocean conservation.

This fantastic new attraction is the first of its kind and can be enjoyed by ocean lovers of all ages, although some features were created to inspire children to become future ocean defenders. This is very exciting, as children have the ability to make serious change and pave the way for a brighter, biodiverse tomorrow. Considering the alternatives, like SeaWorld, which do not educate or empower children to protect animals, Encounter: Ocean Odyssey is a welcomed addition to the world of public education and conservation.

To view some astonishing photos and videos from this captivating visual experience, you can visit the National Geographic Encounter Instagram page.

To learn more about the attraction, ask questions, and reserve tickets, you can visit the Encounter: Ocean Odyssey website here.

And remember to share this exciting news with your family and friends!

Image Source: NatGeoEncounter/Instagram

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