Looks like the oceans have a much-needed friend on their side: Prince Charles. Recently, at the “Our Oceans” conference in Malta, Prince Charles gave an adamant speech about how action must be taken to save our oceans and marine life, insisting that countries take a “global look” at overfishing and illegal fishing.

“We may be able to turn the tide,” he shared, and emphasized that we must act now act now to stop the “elephant in the room,” which is, of course, climate change. “How will future generations ever forgive us?”

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Overfishing is one of the biggest threats to our planet. Entire species have been nearly obliterated by the demand for seafood, with experts estimating that nearly 80 percent of the world’s fish stocks have been fully exploited or are in decline and that 90 percent of the ocean’s large predatory fish have been wiped out. If current trends continue, the Earth’s fisheries are likely to collapse entirely by the year 2050. These drastic depletions are causing devastating effects to the ocean’s delicate food chains and ecosystems.

Prince Charles also addressed the world’s ever-growing plastic pollution crisis, urging people to reuse and reduce their plastic use and stating that the “sense of urgency” is still lacking.

In the last 40 years alone, half of all marine life has been lost – and, if nothing changes, scientists estimate that there will be more plastic than fish in the oceans by the year 2050. With around 8.8 million tons of plastic entering the oceans every year and 83 percent of the world’s tap water being polluted with microplastics, no one can deny the very reality and severity of plastic pollution of our planet.

You don’t have to be a Prince to help the planet. To learn how to use less plastic in your everyday life, check out One Green Planet’s #CrushPlastic campaign. You can also help the world’s oceans by reducing or eliminating your consumption of seafood. One person can keep 225 fish in the ocean every year by choosing a plant-based alternative. If the oceans die, we die – so this is a vital move to keep our seas healthy and alive for future generations.

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Image source: Wikimedia Commons 

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