It is hard to believe that bullfighting is, by many, considered entertainment or a sport. The history of this phenomenon is shrouded in mysticism and glorification of what is traditional, which makes it overwhelmingly difficult to uproot the violent pastime that bullfighting really is. Painted by Manet and described by Hemingway, bullfights became for many tourists just a traditional local attraction absolutely necessary to witness when one is in placed like Spain or Colombia. The bloody reality of this cruel spectacle is oftentimes pushed to the background of our consciousness.

Fortunately, the tides are slowly turning and, throughout the years, many countries have recognized the unacceptable violence of bullfights. A great example of people fighting against that practice happened recently in Colombia, where the first bullfight in the country’s capital in four years was to take place. Masses of people went into the streets to protest against the fight. The protest fired up rapidly. People were shouting out words like “assassins” and “torturers,” pushing down at the barricades. The protestors were met with civil and riot police forces who used batons, stun grenades, and gas.

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As a result of the protests, the Colombian government, who in 2015 ruled that bullfighting was a part of the cultural heritage, will reconsider that opinion in the light of the fact that bullfights violate the country’s laws regarding mistreatment of animals.

An upheaval like this shows very clearly how many people are on the right side of the conflict – protesting the unbelievable violence towards animals and their slaughter for nothing else but what some consider to be entertainment. We hope that the practice of bullfighting will be outlawed in the country again and the protests will be an example for more people in countries still supporting bullfights – and, with that, a beginning of an end of this bloody practice.

Lead image source: 322851812/Shutterstock

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