June 24, two days after the NYC Mayoral primary and Eric Adams is in the lead with 31.7% of the reported vote, Maya Wiley and Kathryn Garcia are close to each other in second and third place and each trail Adams by at least 10%. So where does each of these frontrunners compare on climate, food, and public health?

Maya Wiley’s robust climate Community First Climate Action Plan includes $3 billion in infrastructure investment for climate resiliency, $2 billion in repairs, and steps on pollution. She visualizes a “carbon negative” future for the city. Like Wiley, Garcia published a long list of climate proposals. She also spoke about protecting the city residents from flooding, extreme heat, and pollution. Garcia emphasizes a Green New Deal for NYCHA and wants to “move New York City to a fully renewable energy economy starting on day one” as well as “make NYC a green oasis.” Adams’ proposal focuses on cleaner energy, like wind, solar, and battery power, and waste management improvements that include tax credits. He also wants to de-power “peaker plants” that operate during high times of energy demand and create more green jobs.

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When it comes to public health, Garcia wants to provide all residents with quality, affordable care, including improved coordination between systems and a focus on fixing the mental health crisis. She also acknowledges the link that health has with housing, employment, and the environment and thus, will take a “holistic approach” to address health in NYC. Wiley unveiled a plant for city-sponsored health insurance for low-income and undocumented residents. Her Universal Health Coverage Plan will also repurpose wasteful city spending to offer affordable healthcare with sliding scale premiums for all New Yorkers. Adams‘ plan includes a stronger public safety net and increasing healthcare coverage for residents. He also wants to close the racial gap in healthcare by providing more health resources in underserved communities and focusing on the link between social issues and public health.

Adams‘ platform includes managing food resources to fight hunger and using a community structure to coordinate food policy in the city. He also hopes to make resources more accessible by reducing the amount of paperwork required to receive city services, such as SNAP, through the use of a MyCity portal. Garcia noted the importance of improving the Mayor’s Office of Food Policy and adding staffing and resources to the department. She is known for helping provide food for people during the pandemic and wants to make healthy food more accessible around the city. Wiley noted that people that are hungry might be choosing to pay rent over buying food and the importance of addressing “the city’s ability to generate new jobs,” to help reduce food scarcity. Her plans focus on addressing the “root causes” of food insecurity, such as income inequality and unemployment. Garcia also noted the role of income in food scarcity.

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