The Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network, which is part of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Oiled Wildlife Care Network, is currently caring for frogs that were affected by the Toro Canyon Creek oil incident. The group rescued 80 frogs who were covered in oil, helped to clean them up, and are now rehabilitating them. Most of the affected frogs are Baja California Tree frogs, but the group also includes a few other species. 

These kinds of oil spills can be incredibly damaging to wildlife, including frogs, because the oil is often toxic to animals and can make it harder for them to survive and find food.

Dr. Avery Berkowitz, SBWCN’s Director of Animal Care and full-time veterinarian, said, “As a partner of Oiled Wildlife Care Network. We are always on standby to step in whenever help is needed. 80 additional patients is a big influx for our team. But we’re rallying together to make sure these frogs receive the care they need.”

The Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network is currently building a new wildlife hospital for situations just like this one. Thus, in the future, they can be better prepared to take care of large numbers of affected wildlife.

Ariana Katovich, Executive Director of SBWCN, said, “Currently, most oiled animals we receive need to be transferred to a partner organization over two hours away. After the new Wildlife Hospital is completed. We’ll be able to wash and rehabilitate hundreds of more oiled animals on site. These upgrades will be critical to providing support for oil incidents like this one.”

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