Less fat, more flavor — these tender, baked artichoke crab cakes are chock full of corn, bits of vegetables, and all the seafood flavor you love, nestled under a light, crispy crust. The most difficult parts of this recipe are the pulsing of the artichokes and the chopping of a few veggies. Not tough at all.

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Baked Artichoke ‘Crab’ Cakes [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Calories

170

Serves

5

Cooking Time

25

Ingredients

For the Tartar Sauce:

  • 1/3 cup vegan mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons coarse ground, prepared mustard

For the Crab Cakes:

  • 2 15-ounce cans of artichoke hearts, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs or crushed gluten-free crackers
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 1/4 cup corn kernels, fresh or frozen
  • 1/4 cup chopped vegetable mixture (red cabbage, red onion, and bell pepper)
  • A handful of chopped parsley
  • 2 teaspoons Old Bay seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Coconut oil, for greasing baking sheet
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Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. Mix tartar sauce ingredients and set aside; pulse the artichoke hearts a few times in a food processor to a crabmeat-like texture, but not puréed.
  3. Into a large bowl, stir in artichoke hearts, bread crumbs, green onions, corn kernels, vegetables, parsley, Old Bay, garlic powder, salt, and pepper; stir until just combined. Dorm into cakes and place onto coconut oil-greased baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes, flipping halfway through. Serve topped with tartar sauce.

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Nutritional Information

Total Calories: 848 | Total Carbs: 133 g | Total Fat: 21 g | Total Protein: 28 g | Total Sodium: 4956 g | Total Sugar: 14 g Per Serving: Calories: 170 | Carbs: 27 g | Fat: 4 g | Protein: 6 g | Sodium: 991 mg | Sugar: 3 g Calculation not including oil for greasing the pan or salt to taste. Note: The information shown is based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.


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