Buzz Petition

There’s no doubt about it, Guam has a huge stray dog problem. There is a reported, one stray dog for every seven people living on the island and oftentimes, the dog’s can be aggressive. Residents have voiced concerns over children being nearly attacked along with other concerns that come with a stray dog population of 25,000. While there is no denying that there is a problem and it is in dire need of a solution, it did not get this way on its own, nor is it the dogs’ fault.

According to a petition on Care2, Guam’s Stray Dog Committee has passed some legislation that, if implemented immediately and enforced, can reduce the number of strays by 75 percent in less than two years. This new plan will require pet parents to microchip and spay or neuter their pets. It also calls for taking responsibility for strays that you choose to feed. These are all great proposals, however, these are ideas that should have been taken a long time ago. As a result, the dogs are the ones that are on the losing end of the stick.

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When a stray is picked up and taken to the island’s shelters, they are only given three days to be rescued. Once the three days are up, the animal can be euthanized. This is hardly giving these innocent dogs a chance. The odds are already against them, living on the streets, struggling to find food, just trying to survive. For the dogs of Guam, this is a slap in the face. They deserve better.

We are positive a more humane solution can be found for controlling the stray population. As Guam is taking steps, we need to encourage to consider all lives, human and animal. Killing is never the answer and you can use your voice to remind them of that. With tourism being a huge part of their economy your voice does have power and they will listen if enough people hold them responsible. Sign the petition and tell Guam’s Stray Dog Committee and legislators that you understand the situation but there is a better way … that kindness and compassion always win.

Buzz Petition

Image Source: interactiv2/Pixabay